0

Edema: Symptoms, Causes and Treatment : Your online pharmacy selection

Filter
Number of products : 13
Sort
Sort
Close
Weleda Vitaria 200 chewable tablets Weleda Vitaria 200 chewable tablets
€19.49
In stock
LCA Organic Juniper essential oil from Provence LCA Organic Juniper essential oil from Provence
€11.25
In stock
Aboca Lynfase Fitomagra Tisane Drainante Aboca Lynfase Fitomagra Tisane Drainante
€9.40
In stock
LCA Pistachio Mastic essential oil LCA Pistachio Mastic essential oil
€18.07
In stock
Solaray Bromelain 500 mg 60 capsules Solaray Bromelain 500 mg 60 capsules
€31.15
In stock
LCA Huile végétale Helichryse Italienne/Immortelle 50ml LCA Huile végétale Helichryse Italienne/Immortelle 50ml
€10.49
In stock
Propolia Circulatory Complex 90 tablets Propolia Circulatory Complex 90 tablets
€14.90
In stock
LCA essential oil of Vetiver bio LCA essential oil of Vetiver bio
€10.40
In stock
Water Pill Rétention d'Eau 30 tablets Nutreov Water Pill Rétention d'Eau 30 tablets Nutreov
€16.25
Add to cart
Out of stock
Ladrôme Organic Fresh Plant Extracts Sweet Clover 50ml Ladrôme Organic Fresh Plant Extracts Sweet Clover 50ml
€8.90
In stock
LCA Organic Lemongrass Essential Oil LCA Organic Lemongrass Essential Oil
€5.70
Shipped in 5 to 7 working days
Chicory cut IPHYM Herbalism Cichorium intybus Sheet Chicory cut IPHYM Herbalism Cichorium intybus Sheet
€9.29
Add to cart
Usually ships in 5-7 business days

What is edema and what are its main symptoms?

Edema refers to an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the body's tissues, often leading to noticeable swelling. Symptoms vary according to the location of the edema, but generally include swelling of affected tissues, a feeling of heaviness, and skin that may appear taut and shiny. Commonly affected areas are the feet, ankles and hands.

What are the main causes of edema?

There are many causes of edema, ranging from the benign to more serious medical conditions. Common triggers include water retention, often linked to excessive salt consumption, but also circulation problems, allergic reactions, or medical conditions such as heart failure, kidney disease, or liver ailments.

How is edema diagnosed?

Edema is usually diagnosed by a thorough physical examination. The doctor may also recommend additional tests such as a blood test, X-ray, echocardiogram or other imaging examinations to determine the underlying cause of edema.

What are the best treatment strategies for edema?

Treatment of edema depends largely on its cause. Interventions can include lifestyle modifications such as reducing salt intake, increasing physical activity, and elevating affected limbs to improve circulation. Medications, such as diuretics, may also be prescribed to help remove excess fluid from the body.

Can edema be prevented?

While not all types of edema are preventable, there are many strategies that can help reduce the risk of their occurrence. These include maintaining a healthy weight, eating a balanced diet low in salt, and staying well hydrated. It's also a good idea to watch out for warning signs and see a healthcare professional for regular assessments if you have conditions that predispose to edema.

Can edema indicate a medical emergency?

In some cases, edema may indicate a medical emergency. For example, pulmonary edema, which is swelling of the lungs due to fluid accumulation, requires immediate medical intervention. Similarly, edema accompanied by intense pain, confusion, breathing difficulties or rapid skin changes should be assessed by a professional without delay.

What's the difference between peripheral and central edema?

Peripheral ed ema mainly affects the body's limbs, such as the feet, ankles and hands, and is often observable by visible swelling and a feeling of heaviness. Central edema, on the other hand, involves the central parts of the body, including the lungs and abdomen. Pulmonary edema, for example, can lead to serious symptoms such as difficulty in breathing, and requires urgent medical attention.

Can edema be linked to medication?

Yes, some medications can cause or aggravate edema. These include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), certain diabetes medications such as pioglitazone, and hypertensive drugs such as calcium channel blockers. If you suspect your edema is related to a medication you're taking, it's crucial to consult a healthcare professional who may be able to adjust your treatment.

What is the link between edema and nutrition?

Nutrition plays a key role in the management and prevention of edema. A diet high in salt can exacerbate water retention, increasing the risk of edema. It is advisable to follow a diet low in sodium and high in potassium, the latter helping to balance fluid levels in the body. Natural diuretic foods, such as cucumber, celery and asparagus, can also help reduce swelling.

How does exercise influence edema?

Exercise is good for blood circulation and can help prevent fluid build-up in the limbs, particularly in people with peripheral edema. Activities such as walking, swimming or cycling stimulate circulation without putting undue stress on the body. However, it's important to consult a healthcare professional before starting or modifying an exercise program, especially if edema is linked to an underlying medical condition.

Are there any natural treatments for edema?

Although medical treatments are often necessary to manage edema, some natural approaches may be useful as a complement. The use of compression stockings can help reduce swelling by exerting gentle pressure on the legs. Gentle massage and manual lymphatic drainage are also recommended to stimulate lymphatic flow and reduce fluid in the tissues. Finally, certain herbal supplements, such as dandelion extract or nettle, are renowned for their diuretic properties, although they should be used with caution and under medical supervision.